SPRC Blog

5 RUNNING SAFETY PRECAUTIONS YOU MIGHT NOT BE TAKING (BUT SHOULD BE) July 06, 2017 08:00

Safety Tips for Runners/Walkers

 When you go for a walk or a jog, do you take these safety precautions? 

1. Wear an ID

It's very important to have some form of identification, such as an emergency wristband. That way if anything were to happen, your essential information would be readily available.

2. Tell Someone Where You're Going

Be sure to tell a trusted family member or friend the route you will be walking/jogging and your expected return time. If you have a GPS watch with live tracking, don't make that info public, but send it to a close friend or family member.

3. Wear Reflective Gear in Low-Light Conditions

Make it very easy for others (especially drivers) to see you, even if it's during the day.

4. Fuel During Runs Longer than 45 Minutes

On longer runs, don't allow your body to deplete. Fuel with energy gels or other electrolyte replenishers.

5. Plan for Water Stops

Make a route that passes water fountains, or carry water with you to prevent dehydration.

 

Where to Get Equipped?

Look no further than your local running store!

 St. Pete Running Company

6989 22nd Ave N, St. Pete, FL 33710

727-800-5043

Mon-Fri: 10AM - 7PM

Sat: 10AM - 6PM

Sun: 12PM - 5PM

 

 

Blogger Bria is a customer service manager at St. Pete Running Company.


HOW TAPERING WILL PREPARE YOU FOR RACE DAY November 28, 2016 19:00

What You Need to Know About Tapering 

Race season has begun and that means it’s time to plan for this valuable aspect of race preparation:

TAPERING

When your race is looming, it’s important to be prepared. Tapering is part of the training process and will help maximize your race day success.

What is Tapering?

Coach Jimmy Williams, a running and triathlon coach, puts tapering this way:
“Tapering is a gradual decrease in activity duration and intensity to ensure you are in prime condition come race day. Racing is the easy part. Training is the hard part. Training requires progressive loading and recovery cycles over weeks and sometimes months before a race. Tapering can be done as far out as three weeks and as little as three days depending on the race distance. When done correctly, tapering gives an athlete the best chance to earn a personal record at their race and avoid injury from over-training.”

 

How to Properly Taper For Your Race

Here’s a scenario:
Runner Ron’s next half marathon is two weeks away. In Ron’s training plan, he has scheduled workouts ranging from 5-10 miles all the way up to race day. How can Ron better prepare for a successful half marathon? Tapering! Ron can plan on decreasing his mileage prior to his half marathon.
Here are Coach Jimmy's suggestions for Ron:
Two weeks prior to his half marathon, Ron should look to decrease his weekly mileage by 20%. This means that Ron's long run should decrease from 10 miles to 8 miles, and each shorter run should also decrease accordingly. The week before the race, his long run should be no more than 6 miles. I would also tell Ron to not take the day off before the half marathon. We need to activate our muscles before a race rather than let them get stiff from inactivity. Ron should go out for an easy 2-mile run and throw in one or two short race-pace bursts that last for a minute or less.

 

What Are the Benefits of Tapering?

Tapering decreases the likelihood of injury. Rested, relaxed, and loosened muscles perform much better than tired muscles.

Over-exertion prior to a race, especially a half marathon, can cause your race day performance to suffer. Tapering guides your body through easy and light workouts, a process that will assist your body’s natural tendency to store up for race day.

The best benefit of all? Your full potential can be unleashed on the race course. Many athletes have seen better race times as a result of proper tapering.

 

 

 

 

Blogger Bria works at St. Pete Running Company as a customer service manager.


7 MISTAKES RUNNERS MAKE WITH SHOES August 02, 2016 14:09

Picking the Right Shoe For You

 Do You Make These Mistakes With Your Shoes?

  1. Selecting shoes that are too small

A running/walking shoe should be about a half size bigger than the measurement of the foot. For example, a woman who measures at size 8 ½ would most likely have the best fit in a size 9 running shoe or bigger. Swelling occurs during a walk or jog, and having about a thumb width from the longest toe to the end of the shoe is a minimum suggested length.

  1. Running in worn out shoes

This is a big problem with new runners. When shoes are worn out, they should be replaced. A good rule to follow is to buy a new pair after six months of wear. If you keep track of mileage, most shoes will last up to 500 miles, but there are factors such as cushion level in the shoe, foot strike position, weight of the runner, frequency of workouts that can decrease the amount of miles for any given shoe.

  1. Foot shape, arch height, or pronation determine which shoes you buy

This is the #1 mistake made not only by consumers, but also by sports and running store employees. Research has shown these common misconceptions to be false, and that selecting shoes by these factors can actually lead to foot and knee problems. During walking and running, pronation will occur and naturally absorbs shock. Excessive pronation should be corrected with strengthening exercises for the foot, leg, and hip, rather than by a certain type of shoe.

  1. Your shoes have too much cushion or “support”

This is another common mistake. The extra cushioning can cause bad habits to form. The cushion can cause runners to land with greater impact than with a shoe that has less cushioning. Orthotics and inserts for arch support are often not necessary in the long term. A therapist can help increase foot strength with exercises. With increased foot strength, orthotics and inserts will not be needed and a proper running shoe can be selected.

  1. You purchase shoes online

While this may seem like an easy way to replace shoes, it’s also the least effective method of getting the proper model for you. When you find a running or walking shoe that you like, a new model of that shoe will likely come out within 8-12 months of your original purchase of the shoe. New models will come with changes, and some of those changes might mean the new model will not be the ideal shoe for you anymore. The best practice is to go to your local running store and get a shoe fitting to confirm that the newest model of your favorite shoe is still the shoe that will work for you. Not to mention the economic benefits of supporting local shops!

  1. You purchase a shoe based on color or the recommendation of a friend

When it comes to running and walking shoes, do your feet a favor: ignore the colors and judge the shoes by the way they make your feet feel. Men can be just as picky as women when it comes to colors on running shoes. Let the comfort of your feet be your guide rather than the colors on the shoes. Also take any recommendation from a friend with careful consideration. Their foot is different than yours, and their ideal shoe is not very likely to be yours.

    1. Confusing the Signs of Worn Out Shoes with Something Else

    A common sign that shoes are worn out is the onset of bilateral pain in the feet, the knees, or even the hips. If you’ve been running or walking without pain in areas that suddenly begin to hurt on your run, first ask yourself how long you’ve had the shoes. If your mileage exceeds 500 miles or if it’s been more than 6 months since you bought the shoes, it’s possible that the pain you’re experiencing is an indicator that the shoes have worn down and need replacing. Be sure to consult a professional if you believe the pain is not related to your shoes.

     

     

    When it comes to shoes, pick comfort over looks!

     

     

     

     

     Blogger Bria works at St. Pete Running Company as a customer service manager.


    WANT TO TRY RUNNING ON A TRACK? HERE'S YOUR CHANCE! June 21, 2016 20:59

    Come Try Track Training for Free on June 22nd


    We recently started a Track Training Program and we are delighted by how well it's going. People are having fun, working hard and already seeing results.

    Come out Weds, June 22nd at 6:30 PM for a free session!
    First timers, please arrive by 6:15 or sooner.
    Location: Admiral Farragut Academy Track, 501 Park Street North, St. Petersburg, FL. 

     

    Read on to see what participants have to say about our Track Program.

    Here is what people have to say about our program.

    "Track workout is VERY well structured. I'm running faster than I thought I would. My goal is to do a 5K in less than 30 minutes. This workout is going to help me achieve that. The whole environment with all the camaraderie is supportive. That's what I like best. Meeting great people." ~Donna

    "This is my first time at track workout and it is fantastic. It helps to have other runners around. The people are so friendly and helpful." ~Sue

    "I love it. The Coaches are the best. They believe in us." ~VJ

    "I come every week. I've never run on a track before and it's definitely the best surface to run on. I finally learned what a 400 is. This workout is making me run faster. Well worth it." ~Richard

    "I'm enjoying it very much. I haven't run on a track in 30 years, and I missed it. I'll be coming out every time as long as the program is going. Helps me run fast. I love it." ~Jonathan

    "This is my first time at track workout. Great coaches and speedwork. This has helped push me more than I would've pushed myself. I like having someone to chase." ~Lisa

    "I've been coming every week. It's great and I'm loving it. With everybody here, I can keep going. Someday I'm gonna be as fast as Coach Cody and Coach Chris." ~Bob

    "I feel pushed to succeed, but not out of my comfort zone. Track workout gives me a great sense of pride. I just like running with others." ~Sam

     

     

     

     

    Blogger Bria works at St. Pete Running Company as a customer service manager.

    SaveSaveSaveSaveSave

    7 TIPS FOR RUNNERS IN A RUT June 15, 2016 12:57

    Stuck in the Middle?

    Advice for the Mid-Level Runner

    Have you noticed that as time goes on, it gets harder to get faster? Early in our running careers, the gains come easy and often. Later on, it gets tougher.
    Here are 7 Tips for Intermediate Runners that will help push you along:

     

    • Change Things Up - If you fall into a rut or routine, find ways to change it up to prevent a lack of improvement.
    • Make Recovery a Priority - When it comes to running, recovery is very important. Don't push yourself into exhaustion. Make time for recovery.
    • Get the Necessary Tools - You're no longer a newbie, so get what you need to succeed as a runner. Foam rollers and Compression Apparel are essential for serious runners who want to prevent injury and recover from sore muscles.
    • Alternate your Shoes - One pair of shoes should be for shorter runs and one should be for longer runs. Check out THIS BLOG to find out more.
    • Make Realistic Goals - Don't compare yourself to "old" you from a few years ago. We are older now than we've ever been before. That might mean adjusting workouts accordingly.
    • Be Prepared to Change Shoes - Just because you've always worn a certain shoe doesn't mean it will always work for you. Be prepared to try out other shoes that might be better for you as you evolve as a runner.
    • Be Happy with Who You Are - Don't worry about what other people think. Unless you're a professional runner, your race times don't define who you are (even then, they only define your professional ranking). Be proud of your daily running accomplishments.

     

     

     

    Blogger Bria works at St. Pete Running Company as a customer service manager.